New Podcast Up: Attention Deficit Part 2

The ongoing saga of ADD (and sometimes H) continues on today\’s podcast.  I go into more details about how to diagnose it, and the why, what, and when about treatment.  (Go HERE for the podcast, or download it on iTunes.)

One point I make in the podcast is that I do think that stimulant medications are over-prescribed.  They are often used in cases so a person can \”do better.\”  Nearly everyone can increase focus and do better when taking stimulant drugs.  The real question when considering treatment is whether the ADD is really causing problems.

I am sad that our society seems to want to minimize all struggle.  Struggle is not only inherent in life, it is what makes us better and stronger people.  Somehow our society has changed from a mindset of facing struggle to that of avoiding it.  We do ourselves and our children no favors by removing all obstacles.

This doesn\’t mean ADD should not be treated with medication; it just means that the criteria to treat it should be more than just \”it\’s hard.\”

PS: If you want to know why I included the picture at the top of this post, you have to listen to the podcast.

10 thoughts on “New Podcast Up: Attention Deficit Part 2”

  1. Don’t you think that society today pulls the diagnostic trigger a little too quickly for folks who are not truly afflicted with a medical condition? Of course, mental illness, ADHD, etc are real and deserve serious medical attention. It just seems that there is an epidemic of ‘kids with issues’ today, and I wonder if giving so many of them a diagnosis and medication is the best prescription for them. Same argument could be made to adults. http://www.MDWhistleblower.blogspot.com

  2. Don’t you think that society today pulls the diagnostic trigger a little too quickly for folks who are not truly afflicted with a medical condition? Of course, mental illness, ADHD, etc are real and deserve serious medical attention. It just seems that there is an epidemic of ‘kids with issues’ today, and I wonder if giving so many of them a diagnosis and medication is the best prescription for them. Same argument could be made to adults. http://www.MDWhistleblower.blogspot.com

  3. Having taught a fair number of ADD, and ADHD, now called Autism Spectrum Disorders, I found that the best test of whether meds are working is to assess the behaviour and learning outcomes of the student. There are several short pretests to administer, then a test done, again, by the educator during the process.
    I have seen light and day differences in students with or without meds.
    The bottom line is that the teacher, parents and physician can work together. I have advocated for students who need meds revised, as well as reduced or increased. As they grow the necessity for review is important.

    Unfortunately, many choose not to work together. It takes a village to raise a child.

  4. Having taught a fair number of ADD, and ADHD, now called Autism Spectrum Disorders, I found that the best test of whether meds are working is to assess the behaviour and learning outcomes of the student. There are several short pretests to administer, then a test done, again, by the educator during the process.
    I have seen light and day differences in students with or without meds.
    The bottom line is that the teacher, parents and physician can work together. I have advocated for students who need meds revised, as well as reduced or increased. As they grow the necessity for review is important.

    Unfortunately, many choose not to work together. It takes a village to raise a child.

  5. Amen. I couldn’t agree more. When meds work, they are dramatic; and the kids are often really floundering academically and/or socially. The problem is people want a pill to fix the problem (I have seen this in both parents and teachers) rather than to have to do the hard work.

  6. Amen. I couldn’t agree more. When meds work, they are dramatic; and the kids are often really floundering academically and/or socially. The problem is people want a pill to fix the problem (I have seen this in both parents and teachers) rather than to have to do the hard work.

  7. Pretty sure my 8 year old is inattentive add diagnosible (I’ve given her the connors cpt test). But at this point, I am working with her teachers to teach her ways of coping with her distractibility, head in the clouds, short attention span. I figure in the long run, tools will help her more. I’ve decided that if her inattention gets to the point where it is keeping her from learning in school then I’ll consider meds. At this point, though, I think the meds would be a mistake. It’s kind of like the arguments for antidepressants or talk therapy. If u have issues, meds won’t make them disappear – only working on them will. On the other hand, if you are so depressed you can’t get out of the bed in the morning , then the meds can help you get to the point of being able to deal with the problems in talk therapy. Meds aren’t a short cut, but they can help you to help yourself, I guess is what I”m saying. Just my opinion of course and I’m not a doctor or therapist.

  8. Pretty sure my 8 year old is inattentive add diagnosible (I’ve given her the connors cpt test). But at this point, I am working with her teachers to teach her ways of coping with her distractibility, head in the clouds, short attention span. I figure in the long run, tools will help her more. I’ve decided that if her inattention gets to the point where it is keeping her from learning in school then I’ll consider meds. At this point, though, I think the meds would be a mistake. It’s kind of like the arguments for antidepressants or talk therapy. If u have issues, meds won’t make them disappear – only working on them will. On the other hand, if you are so depressed you can’t get out of the bed in the morning , then the meds can help you get to the point of being able to deal with the problems in talk therapy. Meds aren’t a short cut, but they can help you to help yourself, I guess is what I”m saying. Just my opinion of course and I’m not a doctor or therapist.

  9. As a person who has had several labels applied to me over the years (including AD(H)D inattentive type, LD, Asperger’s, etc.) I can certainly relate to the “criteria problem” and the debate in individual cases over the value or not in medication to address these sorts of issues. After several instances of supposed “experts” debating over what to call my particular constellation of neurological glitches, I finally came to the conclusion that there are occasions when the diagnostic label doesn’t really matter that much as long as the person can still get the kind of help (s)he needs. (That could be an entire post on my own blog, actually…) There’s such a variety of humanity encompassed by the terminology that meds and other tackling points like services and programs will wind up helping some but not others; hence the value in people of your persuasion (both in a professional sense and in a “been there, doing that” sense) to figuring out that puzzle when it applies to your patients. I, for one, think you’d be a great help to someone like me IRL…you’ve certainly given me my share of contemplative moments and laughter from this blog! Now I think I’ll go write that post…

  10. As a person who has had several labels applied to me over the years (including AD(H)D inattentive type, LD, Asperger’s, etc.) I can certainly relate to the “criteria problem” and the debate in individual cases over the value or not in medication to address these sorts of issues. After several instances of supposed “experts” debating over what to call my particular constellation of neurological glitches, I finally came to the conclusion that there are occasions when the diagnostic label doesn’t really matter that much as long as the person can still get the kind of help (s)he needs. (That could be an entire post on my own blog, actually…) There’s such a variety of humanity encompassed by the terminology that meds and other tackling points like services and programs will wind up helping some but not others; hence the value in people of your persuasion (both in a professional sense and in a “been there, doing that” sense) to figuring out that puzzle when it applies to your patients. I, for one, think you’d be a great help to someone like me IRL…you’ve certainly given me my share of contemplative moments and laughter from this blog! Now I think I’ll go write that post…

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