Dr. Rob Goes to Washington

I have a big week coming up.  First, the podcast will be officially launched on Tuesday – more on that later.  On Friday I am going to participate in an event at the National Press Club in Washington DC.  That\’s either very exciting or quite scary.  Probably both.

Here is the official announcement:

——–

To join the event live, please contact john.briley@getbetterhealth.com Seating is limited…

\"\"

Congressman Paul Ryan

\"\"

Media Personality Rea Blakey

\"da_inflatable_santa1\"

Giant inflatable Santa

Health Care Reform: Putting Patients First

Elected Officials Join America’s Top Medical Bloggers to Discuss the Real,

Clinical Impact of Health Care Reform

WHEN:

Friday, July 17, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

WHERE:

The National Press Club, Broadcast Operations Center 4th Floor, 529 14th St. NW, Washington, DC

WHO:

Keynote: Representative Paul Ryan, (R-WI), House Budget Committee Ranking Member

Moderator: Rea Blakey, Emmy award-winning health reporter and news anchor, previously with ABC, CNN, and now with Discovery Health

Host: Val Jones, M.D., CEO and Founder of Better Health

Policy Expert: Robert GoldbergPh.D., co-founder and vice president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest (CMPI)

Primary Care Panelists:

Kevin Pho, M.D., Internist and author of KevinMD

Rob Lamberts, M.D., Med/Peds specialist and author of Musings of a Distractible Mind

Alan Dappen, M.D., Family Physician and Better Health contributor

Valerie Tinley, N.P., Nurse Practitioner and Better Health contributor

Specialty Care Panelists:

Kim McAllister, R.N., Emergency Medicine nurse and author of Emergiblog

Westby Fisher, M.D., Cardiac Electrophysiologist and author of Dr.Wes

Rich Fogoros, M.D., Cardiologist and author of Covert Rationing Blog And Fixing American Healthcare

Jim Herndon, M.D., past president of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and Better Health contributor

####

For more information on Better Health, visit http://www.getbetterhealth.com.

———

OK, I added the Santa.


10 thoughts on “Dr. Rob Goes to Washington”

  1. you may be ready for Washington, but is Washington ready for YOU?
    go get ’em indeed!!!

  2. you may be ready for Washington, but is Washington ready for YOU?
    go get ’em indeed!!!

  3. Wow — that’s awesome! And because I’m a ginormous dork, I’m hugely impressed that I’ve read these folks’ blogs and have even co-commented on some with them. Oh well :)) Rock on!

  4. Wow — that’s awesome! And because I’m a ginormous dork, I’m hugely impressed that I’ve read these folks’ blogs and have even co-commented on some with them. Oh well :)) Rock on!

  5. Here are some more ideas:
    1) Physician reimbursement rated depend on patient feedback and turnover rates. Highly rated doctors and those with low average turnover get a 10% higher reimbursement rate. Those with high turnover and bad feedback, get docked 10%. Rewarding and penalizing on those two metrics together should overall reduce costs and improve quality.
    2) For tests that have been ordered recently from multiple sources — if the first to order does not share– 10% cut on reimbursement. Second to order — did not check — 10% reimbursement cut. Second institution does not order but uses recent tests — 10% bonus to both sides of the transaction. Exception for highly critical situations or where previous test results would not have been useful.
    3) Require price transparency for medications, tests and procedures so that consumers can shop — and give some sort of rebate for choosing lower cost alternatives.It is crazy that for expenditures the size of medical bills, people cannot comparison shop. For example, the local MRI is an old 1.5T and wants $5000 for test a. MRI across the country has much better resolution (3T) and because it is cash only, charges $450. I could fly cross country, stay at the nicest hotel, eat at the nicest restaraunt and still pay for some darn good shopping for the price difference. Frankly, I would happy just that my insurance would reimburse me for the whole $450. But they won’t so my next MRI will be on the dinosaur and they will pay through the nose. I have seen $300 a month differences in the cost of a prescription depending on where I get it filled — advertised — not. And if my only part of the deal is to pay gas money and wait in line, guess what, I’ll go to the nearby place with no line, even if it costs the insurance company more. This could be addressed pretty easily.

  6. Here are some more ideas:
    1) Physician reimbursement rated depend on patient feedback and turnover rates. Highly rated doctors and those with low average turnover get a 10% higher reimbursement rate. Those with high turnover and bad feedback, get docked 10%. Rewarding and penalizing on those two metrics together should overall reduce costs and improve quality.
    2) For tests that have been ordered recently from multiple sources — if the first to order does not share– 10% cut on reimbursement. Second to order — did not check — 10% reimbursement cut. Second institution does not order but uses recent tests — 10% bonus to both sides of the transaction. Exception for highly critical situations or where previous test results would not have been useful.
    3) Require price transparency for medications, tests and procedures so that consumers can shop — and give some sort of rebate for choosing lower cost alternatives.It is crazy that for expenditures the size of medical bills, people cannot comparison shop. For example, the local MRI is an old 1.5T and wants $5000 for test a. MRI across the country has much better resolution (3T) and because it is cash only, charges $450. I could fly cross country, stay at the nicest hotel, eat at the nicest restaraunt and still pay for some darn good shopping for the price difference. Frankly, I would happy just that my insurance would reimburse me for the whole $450. But they won’t so my next MRI will be on the dinosaur and they will pay through the nose. I have seen $300 a month differences in the cost of a prescription depending on where I get it filled — advertised — not. And if my only part of the deal is to pay gas money and wait in line, guess what, I’ll go to the nearby place with no line, even if it costs the insurance company more. This could be addressed pretty easily.

Comments are closed.